Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
KQED (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: fresh from addressing the nation, president obama opened a new campaign today to sell his secd-term economic plan. in turn, republicans dismissed most of his ideas as the failed policies of the past. the president flew south today, going directly to voters with his ideas for creating jobs and boosting the middle class. the post state of the union tour began in asheville, north carolina, at a plant that makes heavy-duty engines. he picked up where he had left off with his message the night before. >> our job as americans is to restore that basic bargain that says if you work hard, if you're willing to meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead. ( applause ) you can get ahead. doesn't matter what you look like, doesn't matter where you come
documentary "cliff-hanger" on pbs takes us behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff drama on capitol hill. let's take a look at a clip. >> these guys are going into the meeting with the president. boehner has just been humiliated by his own people with the plan "b" debacle. and he tells harry reid to go [ bleep ] himself. >> harry reid looks up and he says, what? excuse me? and boehner says it again. >> hey, listen. senator reid and i are close friends. we've got to work together. but just like any close friends, sometimes you just need to clear the air. and we did. >> i can't imagine that happening. >> oh, gee. oh, that's never happened on capitol hill before, has it, michael? >> i was talking about between us. that's okay. >> that would never happen. so michael, take us behind the scenes. here i suspect pass is going to be prologged several times in the future. >> well, exactly right. when i look forward to the state of the union address tomorrow night, i'm looking forward to seeing john boehner and joe biden sitting behind barack obama, especially after what i learned in the last six months
. adam lanza is the subject of a front line documentary on pbs tonight. according to reporters, police investigators found thousands of dollars worth of graphically violent video games in the lanza household. >> i think he did what he knew how to do. graphically violent video games don't make you turn into violence if that's not your predisposition. but this kid had a lot going on. >> let's bring in msnbc contributor ari melber, correspondent for "the nation" and msnbc contributor goldie taylor, managing editor of the goldie taylor project. good afternoon to both of you. ari, we're learning more from these reports of a darkly obsessive behavior, possibly inspired by other mass shooters on the part of adam hahn lanza, including the suggestion that anders breivik may had have some influence. how do we focus on improving the provision of mental health services at the same time as addressing things like high capacity magazines? because it seems to me as though the mental health component has kind of been lost in the discussion more recently. >> i think it has been somewhat lost and it goes
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
love this story. pbs front line, we'll see on you tough the president is whatever he says, they're going to call it divisive, right and he's a hater. whatever. they detailed rush did his recent budget battles with one scene taking a look at the speech. remember when the president eviscerated paul ryan's budget and paul ryan was there. he was talking about the proposal to privatize medicare. it says that 10 years from now if you're a 65-year-old eligible for medicare, you'll have to pay $6,400 more than you would today. instead of guaranteed health care, you'd get a voucher and if you can't buy insurance, tough luck. it ends medicare as we know it. ryan at the time called that a partisan broadside. seriously, jacki is there anything in there that's nasty or personal? >> no, but it's the screaming "you lie" at the state of the union is pretty nasty. every time you poke them in any way, it's a horrible attack of epic proportions and then they smack back, and they're like i don't know what you're to us. stephanie: right. according to the front line special, the administration offici
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)